Pursuing Perfection

pursue-perfection

“Perfect is the enemy of the good.”

— Voltaire

Move one rung down from perfection on the performance ladder and you find “good enough.” And when it comes to achieving an athletic goal, good enough rarely is.

Pursuing perfection has the funny side affect of causing you to continually improve every detail of your training. It gives us a base motivation to be better at something. As athletes, that constant improvement is what keeps us coming back.

To progress in any sport, including CrossFit, requires a serious need for attention to detail. To the athlete in search of perfection, simply going through the motions isn’t enough. The movements that we coach at Focus (functional, multi-jointed movements) are so rich and varied that you really can’t stop studying them. You simply keep peeling back layers to discover how you can further refine them. To do this, you have to dissect the movement, study it, and ask yourself, “How can this be better?”

“Don’t practice until you get it right. Practice until you can’t get it wrong.”

True athletes continually search for ways to improve their performance. They understand that going the extra mile—regardless of how exhaustive or painful—can pay positive dividends down the road. As CrossFit athletes, work ethic means pushing yourself through the dark places. It means telling yourself you can do it. It means understanding that the pain is temporary but the rewards are endless.

It’s important to understand that through awareness of movement and the refinement of technique comes improvement. But these are things that require practice and time. Not to mention a willingness to be patient during the process.

Perfection isn’t an end-state, but an ideal. An ideal that inspires continued improvement. An ideal we believe is worth Focusing on.

As in any craft, the learning never stops. As coaches, our responsibility is to encourage our athletes to relentlessly pursue excellence in position, movement, and form.

We take pride in the pursuit of perfection, and we hope it shows.

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